Process

Method
1

Slipcasting

In this process, powder and water are mixed in a blunger to make liquid clay which is called slip. Slip is poured into a plaster of Paris mould which absorbs all excess water. The clay shrinks from the plaster of Paris and the shape is released.

Method
2

Jiggering

A ball of clay is dropped into a mould on a jigger machine. This rotates and a tool presses the clay into the shape as it spins.

3

Fettling

After removal from the mould, seams of clay are left. They need to be scraped off. Firstly with a tool and then sponged for smoothness.

4

Painting

The “greenware” (unfired shape) is painted with underglazes and 3D colours which make the raised dot.

5

Bisquing

The finished article is fired in a kiln to 900 degrees. This is called a bisque firing.

6

Glazing

The pieces are removed from the kiln and brushed off to get rid of excess dust. It is then dipped in a transparent glaze. Glaze is wiped off the base of the piece; otherwise it would stick in the firing.

7

Firing

The pieces are then re-packed in a kiln and fired to 1170 degrees, over 3 days.

8

Finished Ware

When the kiln is unpacked, the ceramics are checked for any faults.

8

Packing Orders

Pieces are selected for the various orders and packed up to get to their destinations.